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What Is Addiction?$
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Don Ross, Harold Kincaid, David Spurrett, and Peter Collins

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262513111

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262513111.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Irrational Action and Addiction

Irrational Action and Addiction

Chapter:
(p.390) (p.391) 15 Irrational Action and Addiction
Source:
What Is Addiction?
Author(s):

Timothy Schroeder

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262513111.003.0016

This chapter argues that addicts are “mugged” by their midbrain reward systems, conceived as forces acting outside the scope of their rationality, and combines ideas from neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. It summarizes the main lines of evidence in the reward system. The long-term effects of the reward system provide a good explanation of abstinent addiction, for they explain both felt cravings and impulses to use. The chapter shows that felt cravings do not realize or produce desires which might make using addictive goods more rational for addicts than for nonaddicts. As addicts are moved by their addictions, they are moved by forces other than desires.

Keywords:   midbrain reward systems, neuroscience, philosophy of mind, addiction, felt cravings, desires, addictive goods

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