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What Is Addiction?$
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Don Ross, Harold Kincaid, David Spurrett, and Peter Collins

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262513111

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262513111.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

The Core Process in Addictions and Other Impulses: Hyperbolic Discounting versus Conditioning and Cognitive Framing

The Core Process in Addictions and Other Impulses: Hyperbolic Discounting versus Conditioning and Cognitive Framing

Chapter:
(p.210) (p.211) 8 The Core Process in Addictions and Other Impulses: Hyperbolic Discounting versus Conditioning and Cognitive Framing
Source:
What Is Addiction?
Author(s):

George Ainslie

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262513111.003.0009

This chapter analyzes the three kinds of theory—visceral reward hypothesis, hyperbolic discounting hypothesis, and cognitive framing hypothesis—and assesses how the conditioned appetite as a theory of sudden craving depends on the interpretation of behavioral data. It argues that the sudden occurrence of appetite when its object is no nearer requires appetite to be reward dependent, and demonstrates that none of the three kinds of theory currently proposed in the literature explains sudden craving in the absence of new information about availability. The chapter contends that either conditioning or hyperbolic discounting might be adequate to account for sudden appetite if consumption is predicted recursively.

Keywords:   visceral reward hypothesis, hyperbolic discounting hypothesis, cognitive framing hypothesis, conditioned appetite, sudden craving, conditioning

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