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Entangled GeographiesEmpire and Technopolitics in the Global Cold War$
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Gabrielle Hecht

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262515788

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262515788.001.0001

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Fifty Years’ Progress in Five: Brasilia—Modernization, Globalism, and the Geopolitics of Flight

Fifty Years’ Progress in Five: Brasilia—Modernization, Globalism, and the Geopolitics of Flight

Chapter:
(p.185) 8 Fifty Years’ Progress in Five: Brasilia—Modernization, Globalism, and the Geopolitics of Flight
Source:
Entangled Geographies
Author(s):

Lars Denicke

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262515788.003.0008

This chapter illustrates how the construction of Brasilia, the new capital of Brazil, marks two pivotal concepts of the Cold War technopolitics of development: Modernization and globalism. Brasilia, conceptualized and planned by the Swiss architect Le Corbusier, is not connected to the Brazil mainland by rail or roadways; the only way to reach it is by airplane. It was envisoned as the hub of a global aviation network connected by air transport, whereas the whole globe was envisoned as becoming gradually connected by airports, and by travel becoming much faster. The chapter details how the projections of a global sphere connected by flight paths—first conceived in the construction of Brasilia—became the forerunner of the geopoltics of flight in the post Cold War era.

Keywords:   Brasilia, technopolitics, modernization, globalism, airplane, Cold War, geopolitics, flight

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