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How Reform Worked in ChinaThe Transition from Plan to Market$
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Yingyi Qian

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262534246

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262534246.001.0001

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Public vs. Private Ownership of Firms: Evidence from Rural China

Public vs. Private Ownership of Firms: Evidence from Rural China

Chapter:
(p.161) 6 Public vs. Private Ownership of Firms: Evidence from Rural China
Source:
How Reform Worked in China
Author(s):

Yingyi Qian

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262534246.003.0007

Why are many of China’s successful rural enterprises publically owned by local communities? Using a set of provincial data, we find that the share of community public firms (Township-Village Enterprises, or TVEs) relative to private enterprises is higher where the central government’s influence is greater, the community government’s power is stronger, and the level of market development is lower. We also find that TVEs help achieve the community government’s goals of increasing government revenue, rural nonfarm employment, and rural income. However, TVEs do not increase rural income given the levels of non-farm employment and/or local public goods provision, indicating possible inefficiency as compared to private enterprises.

Keywords:   Rural enterprise, Township-Village Enterprise, Market development, Public goods provision, inefficiency

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