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Global Powers in the 21st CenturyStrategies and Relations$
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Alexander T.J. Lennon and Amanda Kozlowski

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262622189

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262622189.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

The Death of Enlargement

The Death of Enlargement

Chapter:
(p.328) The Death of Enlargement
Source:
Global Powers in the 21st Century
Author(s):

Gideon Rachman

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262622189.003.0018

This chapter discusses how many member states of the European Union (EU) have realized that expansion or enlargement of the union is not a viable option for political and economic integration of Europe. The effort to enlarge the union received a setback in May 2005 when France rejected the EU constitution by a majority vote. The Dutch also followed France and rejected the constitution after a few days. France’s rejection of the EU constitution demonstrates that major EU member states are against any moves aimed at enlarging the EU. The French and the Dutch have rejected the EU constitution, fearing that enlargement of the union will allow people from other regional countries, such as Poland, to move and work freely in these countries. The people of these two countries also express concerns that such developments will have an adverse impact on respective cultures and traditions.

Keywords:   European Union, France, EU constitution, Poland

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