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A Future for Public Service Television$
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Des Freedman and Vana Goblot

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781906897710

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9781906897710.001.0001

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Introduction: The Long Revolution

Introduction: The Long Revolution

Chapter:
(p.5) Introduction: The Long Revolution
Source:
A Future for Public Service Television
Author(s):

Des Freedman

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9781906897710.003.0002

This introduction begins with a brief discussion on the staying power of television, given the fact that it is no longer supposed to exist with the rise of the Internet and digital platforms. In fact, the Internet has not killed television but actually extended its appeal — liberating it from the confines of the living room where it sat unchallenged for half a century and propelling it, via new screens, into our bedrooms, kitchens, offices, buses, trains and streets. The chapter then describes the Puttnam Inquiry into the Future of Public Service Television and sets out the book's purpose, which is to contribute to the discussion about what kind of public service media people want and to provide some blueprints for future policy action. An overview of the subsequent chapters is also presented.

Keywords:   Internet, TV, digital platforms, public service television, Puttnam Inquiry, public service broadcasting

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